THE COLOR OF LIFE

[ish_headline tag_size=”h3″ color=”color7″ icon_align=”left” tag=”h” tooltip_color=”color1″]Let the colors bring light into your life[/ish_headline][ish_image image=”2469″ size=”theme-half” tooltip_color=”color1″ align=”left”]

Most light sources are mixtures of various wavelengths of light. Many such sources can still effectively produce a spectral color, as the eye cannot distinguish them from single-wavelength sources. For example, most computer displays reproduce the spectral color orange as a combination of red and green light; it appears orange because the red and green are mixed in the right proportions to allow the eye’s cones to respond the way they do to the spectral color orange.

A useful concept in understanding the perceived color of a non-monochromatic light source is the dominant wavelength, which identifies the single wavelength of light that produces a sensation most similar to the light source. Dominant wavelength is roughly akin to hue.

There are many color perceptions that by definition cannot be pure spectral colors due to desaturation or because they are purples (mixtures of red and violet light, from opposite ends of the spectrum). Some examples of necessarily non-spectral colors are the achromatic colors (black, gray, and white) and colors such as pink, tan, and magenta.

Two different light spectra that have the same effect on the three color receptors in the human eye will be perceived as the same color. They are metamers of that color. This is exemplified by the white light emitted by fluorescent lamps, which typically has a spectrum of a few narrow bands, while daylight has a continuous spectrum. The human eye cannot tell the difference between such light spectra just by looking into the light source, although reflected colors from objects can look different. (This is often exploited; for example, to make fruit or tomatoes look more intensely red.)

[ish_headline tag_size=”h3″ color=”color7″ icon_align=”left” tag=”h” tooltip_color=”color1″]Human Color Perceptions[/ish_headline][ish_tabs color=”color7″ text_color=”color4″ layout=”vertical-right” tooltip_color=”color1″ vertical_layout=”3-1″ contents_color=”color13″ contents_text_color=”color1″][ish_tab tab_title=”Light Sources” icon_align=”left” tooltip_color=”color1″]

Most light sources are mixtures of various wavelengths of light. Many such sources can still effectively produce a spectral color, as the eye cannot distinguish them from single-wavelength sources. For example, most computer displays reproduce the spectral color orange as a combination of red and green light; it appears orange because the red and green are mixed in the right proportions to allow the eye’s cones to respond the way they do to the spectral color orange.

[/ish_tab][ish_tab tab_title=”Color Perceptions” icon_align=”left” tooltip_color=”color1″]

Similarly, most human color perceptions can be generated by a mixture of three colors called primaries. This is used to reproduce color scenes in photography, printing, television, and other media. There are a number of methods or color spaces for specifying a color in terms of three particular primary colors. Each method has its advantages and disadvantages depending on the particular application.

[/ish_tab][ish_tab tab_title=”Color Response” icon_align=”left” tooltip_color=”color1″]

The different color response of different devices can be problematic if not properly managed. For color information stored and transferred in digital form, color management techniques, such as those based on ICC profiles, can help to avoid distortions of the reproduced colors.

[/ish_tab][/ish_tabs]

Similarly, most human color perceptions can be generated by a mixture of three colors called primaries. This is used to reproduce color scenes in photography, printing, television, and other media. There are a number of methods or color spaces for specifying a color in terms of three particular primary colors. Each method has its advantages and disadvantages depending on the particular application.

[ish_headline tag_size=”h3″ color=”color7″ icon_align=”left” tag=”h” tooltip_color=”color1″]Mixing colors[/ish_headline]

No mixture of colors, however, can produce a response truly identical to that of a spectral color, although one can get close, especially for the longer wavelengths, where the CIE 1931 color space chromaticity diagram has a nearly straight edge. For example, mixing green light (530 nm) and blue light (460 nm) produces cyan light that is slightly desaturated, because response of the red color receptor would be greater to the green and blue light in the mixture than it would be to a pure cyan light at 485 nm that has the same intensity as the mixture of blue and green.

Because of this, and because the primaries in color printing systems generally are not pure themselves, the colors reproduced are never perfectly saturated spectral colors, and so spectral colors cannot be matched exactly. However, natural scenes rarely contain fully saturated colors, thus such scenes can usually be approximated well by these systems. The range of colors that can be reproduced with a given color reproduction system is called the gamut. The CIE chromaticity diagram can be used to describe the gamut.

[ish_headline tag_size=”h3″ color=”color7″ icon_align=”left” tag=”h” tooltip_color=”color1″]Problems with color reproduction[/ish_headline]

Another problem with color reproduction systems is connected with the acquisition devices, like cameras or scanners. The characteristics of the color sensors in the devices are often very far from the characteristics of the receptors in the human eye. In effect, acquisition of colors can be relatively poor if they have special, often very “jagged”, spectra caused for example by unusual lighting of the photographed scene. A color reproduction system “tuned” to a human with normal color vision may give very inaccurate results for other observers.

[ish_skills skill_color=”color6″ tooltip_color=”color1″ text_color=”color3″][ish_skill percent=”90″ tooltip_color=”color1″]Color Sensors[/ish_skill][ish_skill percent=”75″ tooltip_color=”color1″]ICC Profiles[/ish_skill][/ish_skills]

The different color response of different devices can be problematic if not properly managed. For color information stored and transferred in digital form, color management techniques, such as those based on ICC profiles, can help to avoid distortions of the reproduced colors. Color management does not circumvent the gamut limitations of particular output devices, but can assist in finding good mapping of input colors into the gamut that can be reproduced.

Structural colors are colors caused by interference effects rather than by pigments. Color effects are produced when a material is scored with fine parallel lines, formed of one or more parallel thin layers, or otherwise composed of microstructures on the scale of the color’s wavelength. If the microstructures are spaced randomly, light of shorter wavelengths will be scattered preferentially to produce Tyndall effect colors: the blue of the sky (Rayleigh scattering, caused by structures much smaller than the wavelength of light, in this case air molecules), the luster of opals, and the blue of human irises. If the microstructures are aligned in arrays, for example the array of pits in a CD, they behave as a diffraction grating: the grating reflects different wavelengths in different directions due to interference phenomena, separating mixed “white” light into light of different wavelengths. If the structure is one or more thin layers then it will reflect some wavelengths and transmit others, depending on the layers’ thickness.

Structural color is studied in the field of thin-film optics. A layman’s term that describes particularly the most ordered or the most changeable structural colors is iridescence. Structural color is responsible for the blues and greens of the feathers of many birds (the blue jay, for example), as well as certain butterfly wings and beetle shells. Variations in the pattern’s spacing often give rise to an iridescent effect, as seen in peacock feathers, soap bubbles, films of oil, and mother of pearl, because the reflected color depends upon the viewing angle. Numerous scientists have carried out research in butterfly wings and beetle shells, including Isaac Newton and Robert Hooke. Since 1942, electron micrography has been used, advancing the development of products that exploit structural color, such as “photonic” cosmetics.

SOLID HOSTING PROVIDER

[ish_image image=”2469″ size=”theme-large” link_type=”custom” link_url=”url:http%3A%2F%2Fwww.bluehost.com%2Ftrack%2Fishyoboy||target:%20_blank” tooltip_color=”color1″]
[ish_divider tooltip_color=”color1″]

Bluehost sponsors every WordCamp in the US, Canada and Europe. This is allows WordCamp organizers to spend less time fundraising and spend more time focused on WordCamp programming and planning. Bluehost was the first company to sign on as multi-event sponsor when the program debuted in March of 2013. Huge thanks for Bluehost’s continuing support.

[ish_button el_text=”Try BlueHost Now” url=”url:http%3A%2F%2Fwww.bluehost.com%2Ftrack%2Fishyoboy||target:%20_blank” size=”big” color=”color8″ text_color=”color4″ icon_align=”left” tooltip_color=”color1″ icon=”ish-icon-th” full_width=”yes”]

Bluehost has been a WordPress partner since 2005 and powers over one million WordPress sites. Their goal is to provide outstanding hosting services and customer support for the best possible price. Bluehost is also constantly innovating and upgrading their services and infrastructure at no additional cost to their customers. Join the millions of other website owners that have already chosen Bluehost and see how they can help you with your site.

[ish_divider tooltip_color=”color1″]
[ish_icon icon=”ish-icon-arrows-cw” type=”hexagon_rounded” bg_glow=”yes” color=”color5″ text_color=”color1″ size=”70″ tooltip_color=”color1″ url=”url:http%3A%2F%2Fwww.bluehost.com%2Ftrack%2Fishyoboy||target:%20_blank”][ish_headline tag_size=”h3″ color=”color6″ icon_align=”left” tag=”h” tooltip_color=”color1″]Fast & Optimized[/ish_headline]

Having a solid hosting provider is a must nowadays if you wish to squeeze the maximum out of your website. Delivering all website pages fast is a necessity in order to keep your visitors happy and possibly make some conversions. Using SEO & Speed Optimization plugins is worthless if your hosting provider does not deliver the content as quick as possible.

[ish_icon icon=”ish-icon-html5″ type=”hexagon_rounded” bg_glow=”yes” color=”color5″ text_color=”color12″ size=”70″ tooltip_color=”color1″ url=”url:http%3A%2F%2Fwww.bluehost.com%2Ftrack%2Fishyoboy||target:%20_blank”][ish_headline tag_size=”h3″ color=”color6″ icon_align=”left” tag=”h” tooltip_color=”color1″]Modern & Secure[/ish_headline]

Knowing all your data are safe and secured and a team of trained professionals looks after it day and night just gives you the right feeling. There are hundreds of hosting providers nowadays but are they all taking your data security seriously? Have you experienced situations when your hosting provider got hacked? What your visitors see is that your website got hacked not your provider. Can you afford such situations?

[ish_icon icon=”ish-icon-heart” type=”hexagon_rounded” bg_glow=”yes” color=”color5″ text_color=”color11″ size=”70″ tooltip_color=”color1″ url=”url:http%3A%2F%2Fwww.bluehost.com%2Ftrack%2Fishyoboy||target:%20_blank”][ish_headline tag_size=”h3″ color=”color6″ icon_align=”left” tag=”h” tooltip_color=”color1″]Simply Awesome[/ish_headline]

If you’re tired of all those small, local providers who can promise the entire universe just to sell their product and once it’s done they lose any interest in you, it’s time to shake hands with a global partner that will be there for you 24/7!